Scene from the Westeros Human Resources Department

“Thanks for coming everyone. We’ve had some more . . . unexpected turnover in senior management, and need to consider some new candidates to sit the Iron Throne. You know what we say around here, chaos is a ladder.” Our first candidate is Cersai Lannister. She has been filling the role on an interim basis, and is very keen to […]

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The Collateral Damage of a Competitive Workplace

One of the very first Social Psychology studies, conducted over a hundred years ago, pitted children against each another in a contest, and found they outperformed their own solo efforts. Why? It’s in our brain chemistry. Competition causes a stress response that activates energizing hormones (such as adrenalin). Success brings the activation of our brain’s reward system: feel-good hormones (such […]

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Fighting Off Toxic Workplace Culture

The signs are all there: Lack of positive reinforcement. Bad blood with managers. A general cloud of unhappiness descends over the workplace… The diagnosis? Toxic workplace culture. How do workplaces end up here? There are many factors that can create a toxic culture in the workplace, including: Lack of clear expectations and incentives No sense of community Demands that exceed […]

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Are Work Meetings Really Worth It?

Work meetings can be a controversial subject. Some people think that meetings are essential. Some people see meetings as a big waste of time. But then again, everyone can agree that communication is important. And of course, we can all agree that it’s possible to spend too much time in meetings. What does the research show? Researchers recently analyzed the […]

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Why Do Leaders Ignore Advice?

Some leaders take advice from the experts. They listen to their colleagues. They even listen to subordinates. Other leaders only seem to value their own opinions. We know that this has something to do with power. In general: People in low-power positions are more likely to take advice. People in high-power positions are less likely to take advice.   But […]

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